Africa Asia Europe North America South America Oceania
You are here: Home > Africa > Tunisia

Tunisia

Social conditions

In global comparison, Tunisia is a middle-income country, but wealth is unevenly distributed. Economic growth since the 1990s has reduced poverty, but in 2000, 13% of the population was estimated to live on less than US $ 2/day. Despite several campaigns to improve conditions in the slums, i.e. housing construction and special contributions to the most disadvantaged, urbanization has meant unemployment and poverty in the cities. In rural areas, six out of Tunisians still lack access to clean water. Visit AbbreviationFinder to see the definitions of TUN and acronym for Tunisia.

Society of Tunisia

In addition to investment in education and poverty reduction, the authorities have invested significant resources in building a public health care system; In 2009, 10% of government spending went to the health care sector. The state of health of the population has improved, and the number of doctors and medical facilities has increased significantly. There are (2009) 21 hospital beds and 12 doctors per 10,000 residents. Qualified personnel are available at 95% of deliveries (2006). They have managed to overcome previous common infectious diseases such as diphtheria and typhoid. Infant mortality has also dropped; fewer than 2% of children (16 ‰ 2015) die during their first year of life. Free medical care is available to about half of the population.

Social insurance covers, inter alia, old age pension, health insurance and child allowance. Formally, gender equality prevails (politically, family law, and within working life), and Tunisia is the Arab-Muslim country that has reached the highest in equality. In the countryside and in some areas, however, the traditional gender roles are strong.

Tunis

Tunis, Azulejos (arab. tūnis, by lat. tunes), capital of Tunisia; 651,200 residents (2012), approximately 2 million in the metropolitan area. The city is located on a lake that connects to the Mediterranean. The main port area is located in La Goulette at the mouth of the lake in the Gulf of Tunis. The Old Town, the Medina, is still a lively business and residential district with winding streets and alleys, centered around the Zitounamosque and often with their own specialization. The Medina also houses the National Library as well as a number of well-preserved mosques, smaller museums and old palaces. To the west, the medina adjoins the high-rise Place de la Kasbah with ministries and government administration and by extension Tunis Town Hall and the oldest part of Tunis University. Around the main streets the French-established neighborhoods are spreading with shops, hotels, restaurants, cinemas and cafes. Since independence in 1956, a number of new neighborhoods have spread to the north, west and south. This is partly about well-planned and very modern residential and business districts, and partly about spontaneous settlement arising from the large migration from the inner and southern parts of the country. In addition to being an important commercial city, Tunis also has the textile and food industry, and tourism is of great economic importance. The city is one of Africa's very few cities with an actual urban rail system. It has four lines called light metro, ie. trams in their own route, as they are known from German cities. In addition to being an important commercial city, Tunis also has the textile and food industry, and tourism is of great economic importance. The city is one of Africa's very few cities with an actual urban rail system. It has four lines called light metro, ie. trams in their own route, as they are known from German cities. In addition to being an important commercial city, Tunis also has the textile and food industry, and tourism is of great economic importance. The city is one of Africa's very few cities with an actual urban rail system. It has four lines called light metro, ie. trams in their own route, as they are known from German cities.

History

The city, located near Carthage, got into the 800 AD. importance as the capital of the Aghlabids. In 1160 it became an administrative center for the Almohads, and as a capital of the sea-sides (1228-1574) it had a great time. Under the Almohads a citadel was built, which remained the center of the city until Tunisia in 1881 became French protectorate. The French expanded the city's port and gradually built a whole new European district. Tunis became the capital of Tunisia's independence in 1956.

 

Other Countries in Africa

Homo Society Copyright 2002 - 2020 All Rights Reserved